nourish your soul

November 20, 2014

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Shiba inu, Bangkok

i will wade out
till my thighs are steeped in burning flowers
I will take the sun in my mouth
and leap into the ripe air
Alive
with closed eyes
~e.e. cumming

Artwork: An Aldo Tura ice bucket on an Aldo Tura presentation table. Both covered in dyed parchment (goatskin). Aldo Tura’s parchment dyes are unmatched today. The Kay Bogensen penguin has an articulated neck and the grain of the wood is incorporated into the sleek form of the bird.

Artwork: An Aldo Tura ice bucket on an Aldo Tura presentation table. Both covered in dyed parchment (goatskin). Aldo Tura’s parchment dyes are unmatched today. The Kay Bogensen penguin has an articulated neck and the grain of the wood is incorporated into the sleek form of the bird.

On a quiet little street in Clinton Hill sits Guild Greene Gallery, located in the original 1890s headquarters and laboratory for Bristol Myers. This century, the building has been reimagined as a gallery, tucked gently into the local scenery, the kind of gem you casually come across in Brooklyn more often than not. This holiday season, Guild Greene hosts “Give Joy,” a salon exhibition of art, objects, furniture, toys, and holiday decorations, now through December 21, 2014.

The collection includes works by furniture designers Charles & Ray Eames, Florence Knoll, Milo Baughman, Edward Wormley, Vladimir Kagan, Harvey Probber, Ward Bennett, and George Nelson; painters Kris Krohn, Kamilla Talbot, Robert Goldstrom and Louis Donato; jewelry artists Lori Kaplan, Mary MacGill, and Lisa Jenks; toys and wreaths by Kathy Urbina, barware by Aldo Tura, and prints by Lloyd Miller, among others. “Give Joy” is curated by design team Marla Dekker and Kevork Babian, the proprietors of townhouse.bz.

An online boutique and appointment-only salon based in Brooklyn, townhouse.bz supplies mid-century furniture and decorative art to architects, interior designers, and collectors. Dekker and Babian could be called “mid-century moderns” themselves: born in the 1950s, they were educated by modernist masters during the 1970s. The company was was born in 2010, when Dekker designed a website to put a public face on the business and expanding the market beyond private appointments. And in a twist fit for the Digital Age, the desire to show work in real time and real space had finally taken hold when Kris Krohn of Guild Greene Gallery invited townhouse.bz to participate in a group show in spring 2014.

Babian notes, “We were pleasantly surprised by how many of our pieces were well-received there. Kris invited us to do our first solo show. We were initially hesitant to produce a solo show in August, because that’s when everyone goes on vacation, but that show, ‘Faux Real’, was very successful. We got to know so many people in the neighborhood, and so many people who came over from Bed-Stuy. They would come to eat at Speedy Romeo’s or Mariettas and made Guild Greene Gallery their own little destination place.”

Read the Full Story at THE CHIC.

Q. Sakamaki: This is Gaza

November 17, 2014

Separation Wall at Bethleham, eight-metre-high concrete barrier, that cuts the West Bank city off from Jerusalem. An Israeli watch tower is also seen on the upper left. Israel wants to call this as Security Wall, because suicide bombings and other violent attacks have decreased since the construction of the barrier. On the other hand, it has created so many negative impacts to Palestinians, such as Loss of land, road closures, increase of difficulty in accessing medical and educational services, restricted access to water sources, etc. That is why it is also often called as Apartheid Wall.

Separation Wall at Bethleham, eight-metre-high concrete barrier, that cuts the West Bank city off from Jerusalem. An Israeli watch tower is also seen on the upper left. Israel wants to call this as Security Wall, because suicide bombings and other violent attacks have decreased since the construction of the barrier. On the other hand, it has created so many negative impacts to Palestinians, such as Loss of land, road closures, increase of difficulty in accessing medical and educational services, restricted access to water sources, etc. That is why it is also often called as Apartheid Wall.

eparation Wall at Bethleham, eight-metre-high concrete barrier, that cuts the West Bank city off from Jerusalem. An Israeli watch tower is also seen on the upper left. Israel wants to call this as Security Wall, because suicide bombings and other violent attacks have decreased since the construction of the barrier. On the other hand, it has created so many negative impacts to Palestinians, such as Loss of land, road closures, increase of difficulty in accessing medical and educational services, restricted access to water sources, etc. That is why it is also often called as Apartheid Wall.

eparation Wall at Bethleham, eight-metre-high concrete barrier, that cuts the West Bank city off from Jerusalem. An Israeli watch tower is also seen on the upper left. Israel wants to call this as Security Wall, because suicide bombings and other violent attacks have decreased since the construction of the barrier. On the other hand, it has created so many negative impacts to Palestinians, such as Loss of land, road closures, increase of difficulty in accessing medical and educational services, restricted access to water sources, etc. That is why it is also often called as Apartheid Wall.

A member of the Gaza Parkour Team exercises among the debris in Khuza’a in Khan Yunis, one of the most damaged areas by Israel Defense Forces during the summer’s 50-day war. Parkour is a dramatically growing sport in Gaza. The concept is to move freely and overcome boundaries and barriers, as most Palestinians cannot move freely out of Gaza.

A member of the Gaza Parkour Team exercises among the debris in Khuza’a in Khan Yunis, one of the most damaged areas by Israel Defense Forces during the summer’s 50-day war. Parkour is a dramatically growing sport in Gaza. The concept is to move freely and overcome boundaries and barriers, as most Palestinians cannot move freely out of Gaza.

When Q. Sakamaki’s photographs taken in Gaza after the 50 day war began to appear on his Instagram, a sense of reverence overcame me. What nightmares bring. The system of apartheid is unspeakable, and yet light must be shed. “The truth is on the side of the oppressed,” as Malcolm X said.

Q. Sakamaki shares his work here, in images and words. I thank him for doing the work that hurts my soul.

Miss Rosen: Please talk about why you decided to go to Gaza at this time. As a photojournalist, what is the story that brought you to this devastated land?

Q. Sakamaki: First, this year marks 20th anniversary since I, at the first time, went to Gaza. And it is surely to assess and feel the aftermath of the summer’s 50-day war. Yet, The timing — I went to Gaza several weeks after the war – helps me see more freely and deeply what was happening, in the still fresh war devastated environments, through which I could view/ and or predict, about what is going on in future and what the international community should do.

Please talk about what you discovered upon arriving in Gaza? What were your expectations and how did the measure against the reality of life for the Palestinians ?

I expected the huge destruction. And it was really so. However, I was very surprised at children’s reaction or acts. Many children in Gaza have become very aggressive more than ever. They want to be paid attention, but if they don’t get, they often get violent. Or totally opposite: some get seemingly very depressed.

Can you talk the ways in which the Palestinian children express their aggression ?

If I ignore them, many children often turned their toy guns aggressively at me, sometimes firing the plastic bullets that often hurt people, if those hit on face. I’m also curious to know if you saw any distinctions between those who got aggressive, and those who got depressed (such as age of the children, the gender, etc). Boys in the middle teen are more likely to be aggressive than those in other ages and girls. Pre-teen or low teen girls are more likely to get depressed, compared to those in other ages and boys.

I was particularly struck by your photograph of “A Palestinian boy in Beach Camp” as it made me aware that this is not just photojournalism, it is history.

I am a more journalist, but in terms of photography, I am not the so-called photojournalist. Apart from that, I believe all captured moments are connected, related to the past and future, often very strongly and very importantly. By photographing such moments, I am exploring why human beings were born, why we love and/ or hate each other, and in the situations where we are heading. And, through photography, I want to share, or think together, with people to find those answers. Actually it is part of real core of Journalism.

What do you mean when you say you are a journalist but not a photojournalist ?

Photojournalist usually implies photographers who cover spot news in the style of the so-called news wire type of shooting. My style is in the visual and story base that often covers beyond/ or behind news. Also I don’t like to be defined by my photography—like photo documentary, or photojournalism, or personal or fine art. Each feature is always overlapped with others, and should be so, too. That is why I often feel I am not the so-called photojournalist.

On the other hand, when I cover stories, especially for writing – most in Japanese, I try to check the details and facts of all related actors and elements as much as possible to be fair or not to have bias. In that way, I would be more journalist. Unfortunately, photography is very hard, or nearly impossible, to cover in the same way as that of writing, since by nature photographers have to face the subject in the shootable distance. In other words, I, as writer, feel more journalist, but as photographer, I feel less, or even not photojournalist.

Q. Sakamaki on Instagram

Palestinians take Friday prayers at Al-Susi mosque in Gaza City’s Beach Camp, which was destroyed by Israeli air strikes during the summer’s 50-day war between Israel and Hamas. This was shot for @opensocietyfoundations and the last posting image. At my account @qsakamaki, I will post more Gaza images for few more days.

Palestinians take Friday prayers at Al-Susi mosque in Gaza City’s Beach Camp, which was destroyed by Israeli air strikes during the summer’s 50-day war between Israel and Hamas. This was shot for @opensocietyfoundations and the last posting image. At my account @qsakamaki, I will post more Gaza images for few more days.

A Palestinian boy in Beach Camp, one of the biggest refugee camps in the Palestinian Territories.

A Palestinian boy in Beach Camp, one of the biggest refugee camps in the Palestinian Territories.

Animal market is held at Alshjaia, one of the most destroyed areas in Gaza by the summer's 50 day war between Israel and Hamas. An international organization involved in assessing post-conflict reconstruction says it will take 20 years for the rebuilding. However, the import of critical rebuilding materials, such as cements and other housing stuff, to Gaza remains extremely restricted, as Israel fears that the militants use them to build rockets and tunnels.

Animal market is held at Alshjaia, one of the most destroyed areas in Gaza by the summer’s 50 day war between Israel and Hamas. An international organization involved in assessing post-conflict reconstruction says it will take 20 years for the rebuilding. However, the import of critical rebuilding materials, such as cements and other housing stuff, to Gaza remains extremely restricted, as Israel fears that the militants use them to build rockets and tunnels.

one hundred days

November 16, 2014

Rest in Peace Mike Brown

Rest in Peace Mike Brown

Truth is on the side of the oppressed.
~Malcolm X

Photograph by Arlene Gottfried

Photograph by Arlene Gottfried

Daniel Cooney Fine Art opened in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, in August 2003 before relocating to Chelsea in June 2004. The gallery, which specializes in showing artists such as Nir Arieli, Benjamin Fredrickson and Joseph Maida and Scot Sothern, also conducts fine art auctions online presented by iGavelAuctions.com featuring works by Walker Evans, Peter Hujar, Robert Mapplethorpe, Richard Avedon, Edward Weston, and Alfred Eisenstadt, among others.

Daniel Cooney observes, “To make a good living in this business is nearly impossible. Even if it looks shiny and sparkly on the outside, it’s a different story on the inside.”

It is this empathy and understanding that makes Cooney the perfect gallerist for artists such as Arlene Gottfreid, whose exhibition, “Sometimes Overwhelming: New York in the 70s & 80’s” will be on view through December 20, 2014.

Born in Brooklyn, Gottfried started photographing her personal experiences around the City during a time when it was rough, rugged, and a raw, a time so long ago and far away that her photographs are more than art, they are part of the historical record. They are evidence of a way of life that has all but disappeared, a way of life that said, Do It Yourself, an ethos Cooney embodies to a T.

The exhibition will feature 29 vintage prints of images made in Brooklyn, Soho, the Lower East Side, Riis Beach, Riker’s Island, Central Park, Coney Island, and other parts of the city that Gottfried photographed. Her portraits, at once beguiling with an innocent knowingness, are becoming icons of a New York that has all but slipped away.

Read the Full Story at THE CLICK.

the truth was a mirror

November 13, 2014

 Dance in Tehuantepec, 1928 - Diego Rivera

Dance in Tehuantepec, 1928 – Diego Rivera

it is only
once in a while
that you see
someone whose
electricity
and presence
matches yours
at that
moment
~Charles Bukowski

another way of looking

November 12, 2014

In the Beginning, 1916 by Paul Klee

In the Beginning, 1916 by Paul Klee

I’m a dirt person. I trust the dirt. I don’t trust diamonds and gold.
~Eartha Kitt

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Newport, Rhode Island—celebrated for its stunning seascapes, famous mansions, Jazz Festival, annual Flower Show, and world-class sailing—is 375 years old, making it one of the oldest cities in the United States. What makes this majestic town all the more striking today is its reverence for history and its preservation of the past, not as an antiquated thing, but as a living energy, a continuous present tense.

Newport attracts a class of people that become stewards of the city’s legacy, people who feel charged to maintain the continuity of a way of living that is the epitome of sumptuous elegance and graceful gentility. In celebration of this way of life, Bettie Bearden Pardee has just released her new book, Living Newport: Houses. Places, Style (Glitterati Incorporated), an inspiring and evocative look at entertaining at home, in the garden, or on the sea.

As Bearden Pardee writes in the book’s introduction, “Since its founding in 1639, our fabled seaport has displayed an intriguing ability to evolve. And with each iteration, Newport has not only survived but thrived keeping its identity constant throughout. It has built up a patina, generation upon generation, creating ‘good bones’ as my mother used to say. What touches us is not how much Newport has changed but how, in an endearing way, it has appeared not to change.

“As if on cue, it is Newport’s sophisticated charm which is again attracting a vibrant new crowd and social energy to our shores, a ‘vibe’ that heralds the next chapter in this town’s history-repeating-itself scenario…. It is these impressions that have inspired me to take pen to paper again, to celebrate the private side of this City by the Sea through the prism of those who had the means and opportunity to live anywhere but chose Newport. Whether heirs of the old guard providing a contemporary continuity to traditional Newport or newcomers with their distinct aesthetics, each tastemaker brings a fresh twist to this life.”

Bettie Bearden Pardee sits down with The Chic to discuss Newport in the new millennium. She recalls, “I’ve always had a fascination and a connection with Newport. My husband is from here; that is how we came to live in Newport year round. We first arrived in the early 90s, and in 1999, we built our home next to Rosecliff. The sense of history touches me. I adored growing up in Beverly Hills, but my family is originally from the South. So much history was destroyed during the Civil War. In Newport, the past and present exist seamlessly. There is comfort to that. There is a genuine history that I appreciate.

Read the Full Story at THE CHIC.

when the wind is perfect

November 10, 2014

     Pégase et la Muse, Odilon Redon 105 notes

Pégase et la Muse, Odilon Redon

If the world were merely seductive, that would be easy.
If it were merely challenging, that would be no problem.
But I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world
and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.
~ E.B. White

Salón de té, Montevideo, Uruguay, 1993 by Mario Algaze

Salón de té, Montevideo, Uruguay, 1993 by Mario Algaze

Cuban-born photographer Mario Algaze is master of his craft, on par with such giants as Andre Kertesz, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and the legendary Manuel Alvarez-Bravo. After being exiled from his homeland at the age of thirteen, Algaze relocated to Miami, then went on to travel extensively in Central and South America, seeking a connection with his cultural roots.

A Respect for Light: The Latin American Photographs 1974-2008 (Glitterati Incorporated), his magnum opus, presents the full breadth of the artist’s work, culled from over three decades of travel in sixteen different countries including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, and Peru, as well as his native land of Cuba.

The first comprehensive retrospective of this work will open at HistoryMiami Museum on November 13, from 6:00-8:00pm. The 4,000 s.f. exhibition, curated by by HistoryMiami deputy director Jorge Zamanillo, features over 150 black and white images. A Respect for Light: The Photography of Mario Algaze will be on view through January 18, 2015.

As Jorge Zamanillo recalls, “About two years ago, I was speaking to a museum trustee about photography. He mentioned that one of the photographers whose work he admired, Mario Algaze, lived right here in South Florida. I knew of Mario’s work but had never made the connection to Miami. I immediately contacted him. I was interested in asking him to speak on a panel about photography but he had no interest. After a couple of persistent calls, he asked me over to his home to discuss his work. Aside from the beautiful prints masterly developed in his darkroom, the stories behind each photo and his travels across Latin America were captivating. I knew then that we had to show his work.

“Algaze’s photographs stand on their own merit in a talented field of contemporaries in Latin American photography such as Javier Silva-Meinel in Peru and Graciela Iturbide in Mexico. The balance between the people, the culture, and the settings make Algaze’s compositions unique and they fluctuate between the fine art and documentary photography realms.

“I consider each of Algaze’s images to be similar to the opening shot in a classic black and white film. Their dreamlike quality set the mood and feel of the story. The difference is that the photographs are not staged by a cinematographer but conceived and captured spontaneously by the artist’s eye. That’s where they become fine art.

Read the Full Story at THE CLICK.

when you become we

November 6, 2014

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We look into mirrors but we only see the effects of our times on us
—not our effects on others.
~Pearl Bailey

~*~

Photographs by Steven Siegel

the pure heart

November 5, 2014

Dmitri Kasterine (2002)

Dmitri Kasterine (2002)

True freedom comes about through
confidence in liberating any and all thought states.
~ Tsoknyi Rinpoche

Jack Nicholson by Don Bachardy

Jack Nicholson by Don Bachardy

Hollywood’s best kept secret is a man now 80 years old, a man who, for more than half a century, has sat eye-to-eye with some of the cinema’s greatest luminaries, and has graciously asked them, “Can you please keep still?” That man is Don Bachardy, portrait artist.

Beginning his career at a time when the portrait had all but become a quaint reminder of yesteryear, Bachardy became one of the greatest chroniclers of Hollywood’s crème de la creme. As the longtime partner of English novelist Christopher Isherwood, Bachardy had access the most iconic figures of the silver screen. Collected for the first time in Hollywood (Glitterati Incorporated), the portraits of Don Bachardy include luminaries from Bette Davis, Katherine Hepburn, and George Cukor to Montgomery Clift, Fred Astaire, and Edith Head. Bachardy sits down to speak with The Chic about his life’s work.

Bachardy remembers, “I began drawing very early as a child of three or four years old. It was not until I met Christopher Isherwood when I was 18 years old that I showed him the drawings I had been doing all my life, portraits of movie actors copied from magazines. Chris recognizes all the people I had been drawing and asked me if I had ever worked from life. I had not. He proposed himself as my first sitter.

“My drawing looked very much like him. In all our years together, he looked the oldest in that first little drawing. I remember when he saw it, he was taken aback, but he could not deny that it looked like him. When I had drawn from photographs in magazines and I put in every detail I could see, but the photographs were heavily leaned up. The lines and pouches were taken away. When I worked from life, I put it all in, the crow’s feet. I was innocent. I didn’t know what to leave out.

“Chris encouraged me to go to art school. I went for from nine in the morning until four in the afternoon, then went back again from seven to ten in the evening. I didn’t take a balanced program to get an official degree. It didn’t mean anything to me. I knew I wanted to be an artist. I knew if I didn’t achieve that, nothing would satisfy me.”

Read the Full Story at THE CHIC.

the art of knowing

November 3, 2014

Vladmir Kush

Vladimir Kush

Sometimes it takes years to really grasp what has happened to your life.
~Wilma Rudolph

Photograph by Douglas Kirkland

Photograph by Douglas Kirkland

Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” made music history as MTV’s first world premiere video when the thirteen-minute epic was released on December 2, 1983. Directed by John Landis, who co-wrote the screenplay with Michael Jackson, “Thriller” was budgeted at half a million dollars in production. It has sold 9 million units to date. In 2009, this landmark video was inducted into the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress, the first music video ever to receive this honor.

With exclusive access to the set of “Thriller”, photographer Douglas Kirkland documented Jackson in all his glory. Michael Jackson: The Making of “Thriller”: 4 Days/1983 (Glitterati Incorporated) is an exquisite tribute to the King of Pop. With a hologram cover of Jackson’s remarkable transformation from pop star into dark zombie, the book features 200 never-before-seen photographs. We witness the grandeur and the glory of this production that has made Jackson one of the most beloved artists of our age.

Douglas Kirkland shares his memories of the historic video shoot, providing an incredible firsthand account of the man and the music that changed the world. In an interview with Nancy Griffin, published in the book, Kirkland recalls, “I met Michael Jackson for the first time on the night they were shooting at the Palace Theater, when I was taken to meet him in his trailer. Frankly I was somewhat intimidated at first. I’ve been around a lot of people, but I had no idea what kind of individual he would be. He already had so much myth surrounding him. I wondered if he was going to be strange or odd—who was this person I was going to be with, and how could I best do my job?

“With the power Michael Jackson had demonstrated on stage, and the aura that had been created around him, I expected him to behave like an assured giant in dealing with a LIFE magazine photographer and journalist.

“What I found was somebody who wasn’t remotely threatening or intimidating. In fact, he was disarming, and very responsive. He made me feel at home. He had a small voice and smiled easily, not a big smile but a small smile. A very light handshake as I recall, not a firm, ‘I’m in charge’ kind of handshake at all. Everything about him made me think that he was a gentle person.

Read the Full Story at THE CLICK.

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