Belgrade Belongs To Me

Belgrade Belongs To Me

Photographs by Boogie

A Miss Rosen Edition

“At three o’clock sharp, the enemy must be crushed by your mighty charge, torn to pieces by your grenades and bayonets. The honor of Belgrade must be spotless. Soldiers, heroes, the Supreme Command has erased our names from its roll. Our regiment is sacrificed for our King and Fatherland. You don’t have to worry anymore about your lives that no longer exist. So forward, to glory! Long live the King! Long live Belgrade!” —Major Dragutin Gavrilovic, September 24, 1915

Belgrade Belongs to Me by Boogie

Belgrade Belongs to Me by Boogie

Born and raised in Belgrade, Serbia, Boogie began photographing rebellion and unrest during the civil war that ravaged his country during the 1990s. Growing up in a war-torn country defined Boogie’s style and attraction to the darker side of human existence. His archives reveal undeniable evidence of the evils that erode the urban space and unite humanity in the despair of impoverished lives. Belgrade Belongs to Me, his third powerHouse Book, shows the city from the inside as the former Yugoslavia began its rapid disintegration into war and the slow resurrection of a people who have fought for centuries for their survival.

Boogie does not spare the spectator any social taboos as he documents the daily struggles of the marginalized people whose lives he infiltrates completely, taking us deep into worlds traditionally closed to outsiders. Whether documenting Neo Nazis or gypsies, police or protesters, or the working class people of Belgrade, Boogie’s work reflects his respect for his subjects, defying the glamorized stereotypes of urban life and revealing the phantoms that haunt the modern metropolis.

Belgrade Belongs to Me by Boogie

Belgrade Belongs to Me by Boogie

“Living under Milosevic was like living in a mental institution. It was apocalyptic. Pensions and salaries were three to five United States dollars. People, especially the old and retired, were literally starving. The streets were empty. There was a shortage of gasoline, so there were very few cars on the street. And then, in the middle of the night, you would see a police truck cruising slowly. There were protests against Milosevic every day. In the beginning they were peaceful, so I didn’t go. I don’t believe in peaceful, passive resistance. It’s either grab the gun and go to the woods or sit at home. But then they turned violent. The police were very brutal, beating protesters mercilessly. And that’s when I started to go out and shoot photographs. Milosevic wasn’t sure cops from Belgrade would be tough enough—they might not want to beat on their neighbors. So cops were brought from other parts of Serbia, huge cops with mustaches, in riot gear. I ran from them a few times. Scary.” —Boogie

Belgrade - By Boogie

Belgrade - By Boogie

Boogie was born in Serbia and emigrated to the United States in 1998. The author of It’s All Good and Boogie (powerHouse Books, 2006 and 2007), his work has appeared in publications including Time, The New York Times, Rolling Stone, Playboy, Vibe, and Maxim, among others. His clients include Nike, Lee Jeans, Element Skateboards, and Shellac. Boogie lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Who Shot Rock & Roll A Photographic History, 1955–Present By Gail Buckland

Who Shot Rock & Roll A Photographic History, 1955–Present By Gail Buckland

Roberta Bayley reigns supreme as one of the principal photographers who served as a significant visual chronicler of the punk rock music movement that lasted from the mid-70s up until the early-80s. Bayley worked as a door person at the legendary CBGB’s where she befriended the scene’s most significant figures. Among the punk music artists she has photographed are Iggy Pop, Blondie, Richard Hell, Elvis Costello, The Sex Pistols, Johnny Thunders and The Heartbreakers, Joe Strummer, The Ramones, Nick Lowe, The Damned, The Clash, The Dead Boys, and The New York Dolls. The chief photographer for Punk magazine, Bayley’s photographs have appeared in countless publications including Blank Generation Revisited: The Early Days of Punk, Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk, and CBGB and OMFUG: Thirty Years from the Home of Underground Punk, among others. Bayley co-wrote the book Patti Smith: An Unauthorized Biography with Victor Bockris, and is author of Blondie: Unseen 1976–1980. Her photographs have been exhibited in such major cities as New York, Los Angeles, Sydney, Austin, Paris, Portland, Amsterdam, Tokyo, Hong Kong, London, Mexico City, and Pittsburgh.

Bayley discusses her work, The Heartbreakers, 1975, and The Ramones, New York City, 1976, selected for publication in Who Shot Rock & Roll by Gail Buckland (Knopf, October 2009, $40).

Roberta Bayley Heartbreakers

Roberta Bayley - Heartbreakers

The images Gail selected for the book, The Heartbreakers and The Ramones, are among the most iconic images of punk. Your personal history, working at CBGB’s and photographing the artists (your friends) at the dawn of their careers, put you at the eye of the hurricane (a position I, and many others I am quite sure, look at with envy and awe). Your work is as essential to the scene as the music itself. What did these pictures mean to you when you made them, and has that meaning changed over time, as the photographs have grown into icons?

Roberta Bayley: I made the Ramones image for a shoot for Punk magazine. It was never meant to be the album cover, so there was no pressure on me. John Holmstrom and Legs McNeil were there and we knew the Ramones so it wasn’t a high stress session.  The Ramones record company, SIRE, had already hired a “professional” photographer to shoot the album cover but the band hated the photos and were desperate enough to call me! I was paid $125 for that image and one other to be used for publicity—take it or leave it. I took it. As soon as it was released I knew somehow that it was iconic. Over the years many people, especially in England, told me they were “gobsmacked” seeing the cover, and bought the record just because of that image. There has never been another image of the Ramones that captures that particular perfect moment.

The Heartbreakers “blood” photo is completely different in it’s origin than the Ramones image.  This image was taken from a session that was (literally) the fourth roll of film through my camera! It was taken in my then-unfurnished, brand new apartment on St. Marks Place (where I still live). The blood concept was Richard Hell’s, taken from the product used to simulate blood in 50s B-movies (it was actually Hershey’s syrup).  The photo was used for a New Year’s Eve poster with the phrase “Catch Them While They’re Still Alive”—playing on the band’s reputation as heavy drug users.

The Heartbreakers image did not become “iconic” until it was used for the cover of Please Kill Me in 1996. That book was issued in England, France, Germany, Japan, and Finland, and is still in print. So the image has become associated with that classic book about punk.

Roberta Bayley-Ramones

Roberta Bayley-Ramones

I have always loved the dirty glamour, casual formality, and inescapable individuality your subjects exude. As much as these two images were photo shoots for the bands, there’s nothing contrived about these images. Whether it’s Joey Ramone’s smirk or Johnny Thunder’s bravado, the images feel like they are playing to you, connecting to you, rather than to the camera. What was the energy on these shoots, and how did your personal relationships affect your connection to them?

The people I photographed back then were people I knew, and had known, for a few years. Most of them (all of them?) were not experienced in front of the camera, nor was I experienced behind the camera. We were all winging it. I had a natural talent for relaxing my subjects. Also I worked quickly. Most of my subjects didn’t really love the photo experience. They were musicians and not models. So I tried to relax people, take the photo and end it.  I’m sure there was also an element of flirtation involved, which is part of relaxing your subject, along with humor.

Punk came out of NYC at its grimiest. How did your work reflect the times you were living in (and by that I mean, how did you make a living being a photographer in NYC back in the 70s)?

I had no idea that New York was at its nadir when I arrived in 1974. I had just arrived from London and New York seemed vibrant and fabulous to me!

I did NOT make a living as a photographer in the 70s!  I always had another “day job.” Until 1978 it was CBGB’s and then I worked for Blondie for a year (for $150 a week!). It was only in 2004 that I quit my various day jobs and have made a living solely from my “art”!

You describe working at Punk as a form of “creative insanity.” Can you add to this, I am curious as to how the insanity nurtured and impacted your work?

John and Legs were both a few years younger than me, and they brought a lot of originality and enthusiasm to what they were trying to do with Punk. They didn’t break the rules so much as they had no idea there WERE any rules! Plus there was zero money, which always fuels creativity. Hey, the magazine’s original headquarters was called “the dump” and it was. Three of them lived there and there was no shower. They used to go over to Nancy Spungen’s to bathe. The most fun came out of the “fumettis” which were like movies or comic books in still-photo form. We tried to shoot “on location” as much as possible but if something didn’t work out John could always draw in the special effects later. It was damn good fun and everybody on the scene wanted to be involved. We got people to do crazy things in the name of “art.”

About the book:

From Elton John to Led Zeppelin, Bjork to Janis Joplin, James Brown to John Lennon, Who Shot Rock & Roll is the first book to explore the extraordinary work of the photographers who captured the energy, intoxication, rebellion, and magic of rock & roll with images that have become icons unto themselves.

Featuring more than 250 photos, including many rare and never-before-seen images, Who Shot Rock & Roll is an unparalleled compendium of our shared cultural history. Author and photo historian Gail Buckland provides a compelling collection of portraits, live concert shots, behind-the-scenes snaps, and studio work selected for their aesthetic quality and power. The extended captions tell stories from the photographers that reveal their roll as both creative collaborators and tireless journalists.

As Buckland writes, “Rock and roll is not a musical genre; it is a communal spirit.”  Her book reveals the very essence of rock photography- these mythical rock gods could not exist without artists to document their gifts. Who Shot Rock & Roll is a silent window into a world of sound,” Buckland continues. “There are photographs of crowds and fans reminiscent of the great historical paintings of battle scenes where bodies blend and bend and faces radiate with what can only be described as transcendence. Snapshots reveal the passion, ambition, and insecurity of aspiring young musicians. There are portraits of godheads, objects of mass adoration; the best could hang next to paintings of Renaissance princes, so similar are these royals with their finery, wealth, and power.”

From Ryan McGinley’s Morrissey crowds to Bob Gruen’s John Lennon, Maripol’s Madonna to Richard Avedon’s Everly Brothers, David LaChapelle’s Lil Kim to Henry Diltz’s Tina Turner, Who Shot Rock & Roll presents our idols at their most divine, as captured by some of the greatest artists—most of whom are yet to be recognized—to work in photography.

Featured subjects include: The B-52s, The Beatles, Chuck Berry, Bjork, Blondie, David Bowie, Bow Wow Wow, James Brown, Johnny Cash, Nick Cave, Exene Cervenka, Eric Clapton, The Clash, Kurt Cobain, Elvis Costello, The Cramps, The Dead Boys, P. Diddy, The Doors, Bob Dylan, Marianne Faithful, Aretha Franklin, Alan Freed, Fugazi, Jerry Garcia, Bill Haley, Debbie Harry, Richard Hell, Jimi Hendrix, Buddy Holly, Michael Jackson, Mick Jagger, Jay-Z, Brian Jones, Grace Jones, Janis Joplin, Joy Division, KISS, Gladys Knight, Led Zep, John Lennon, Little Richard, LL Cool J, Madonna, The Mamas and the Papas, Marilyn Manson, Bob Marley, Paul McCartney, Freddy Mercury, Metallica, Method Man, Morrissey, Jim Morrison, New York Dolls, Notorious B.I.G., Oasis, Wilson Pickett, Pink Floyd, The Police, Iggy Pop, Elvis Presley, The Pretenders, Prince, The Prodigy, Radiohead, The Ramones, Red Hot Chili Peppers, R.E.M., Keith Richards, The Ronettes, Rolling Stones, Henry Rollins, Axl Rose, Run-DMC, Salt n Pepa, Sex Pistols, Tupac Shakur,  Sid & Nancy, Patti Smith, Sonic Youth, The Specials, Buffalo Springfield, Bruce Springsteen, Sly Stone, Joe Strummer, Talking Heads, Pete Townsend, Ike & Tina Turner, U2, Velvet Underground, Bunny Wailer, The White Stripes, The Who, Amy Winehouse, Stevie Wonder, Neil Young, and Frank Zappa.

Featured photographers include:  Amy Arbus, Richard Avedon, Ray Avery, David Bailey, Roberta Bayley, Peter Beste, Adrian Boot, Justin Borucki, Patti Boyd, Ed Caraeff, Stephanie Chernikowski, Danny Clinch, Anton Corbijn, David Corio, Kevin Cummins, Henry Diltz, Alain Dister, George DuBose, Andy Earl, Barry Feinstein, Danny Fields, Nat Finkelstein, Glen E. Friedman, Jill Furmanovsky, David Gahr, Godlis, Lynn Goldsmith, Harry Goodwin, Julia Gorton, Jean-Paul Goude, Bob Gruen, Andreas Gursky, Ross Halfin, Hipgnosis, Dennis Hopper, Don Hunstein, Marvin Israel, Art Kane, Richard Kern, Daniel Kramer, David LaChapelle, Elliott Landy, Michael Lavine, Lisa Law, Annie Leibowitz, Jean-Pierre Leloir, , Laura Levine, Ari Marcopoulos, Maripol, Jim Marshall, Elaine Mayes, Linda McCartney, Ryan McGinley, Dennis Morris, Shawn Mortensen, Terry O’Neill, Jean-Marie Perier, Charles Peterson, Ricky Powell, Michael Putland, William “Popsie” Randolph, Marcia Resnick, Ebet Roberts, Mick Rock, Ethan Russell, Jerry Schatzberg, Hannes Schmid, Stephane Sednaoui, Bob Seidemann, Mark Seliger, Stephen Shames, Lloyd Shearer, Kate Simon, Hedi Slimane, Pennie Smith, Gloria Stavers, Chris Stein, Ray Stevenson, Mayayoshi Sukita, Allan Tannenbaum, Edmund Teske, Storm Thorgerson, Ian Tilton, Philip Townsend, Albert Watson, Guy Webster, Barrie Wentzell, Alfred Wertheimer, Kevin Westenberg, Robert Whitaker, Timothy White, Ernest C. Withers, and Baron Wolman.

An exhibition of work from the book will launch at the Brooklyn Museum on October 30 and tour the United States through 2011. The schedule follows:

Brooklyn Museum

October 30th 2009 – January 31st 2010

http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/

Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts

March 5th 2010 – May 30th 2010

http://www.worcesterart.org/

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Tennessee

June 26th 2010 – September 26th 2010

http://www.brooksmuseum.org/

Akron Art Museum, Ohio

October 23rd 2010 – January 23rd 2011

http://www.akronartmuseum.org/

Columbia Museum of Art, South Carolina

February 24th – May 22nd 2011

http://www.columbiamuseum.org/

Gail Buckland has written and collaborated on eleven books of photographic history, including Fox Talbot and the Invention of Photography, The Magic Image (with Cecil Beaton), and The American Century (by Harold Evans). She is former curator of the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain, professor of the history of photography at The Cooper Union, and guest curator at many American museums. She lives in Warwick, New York, and New York City.


American Youth

American Youth Cover

 

From the country’s youngest-ever superdelegate (and Barack Obama supporter), American Idol contestants at tryouts, and strippers in Portland to debutantes at New York’s Plaza Hotel, gangsters on the Navajo Reservation, or widows of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, American Youth provides striking and sometimes startling stories revealing the relationships between self-determination and tradition in our country today.

 American Youth features the work of 25 photographers represented by Redux Pictures, documenting the newest generation of 18 to 24-year-olds in unvarnished detail throughout the book’s 240 pages. Included in the book are NEA Fellow Marc Ashin’s unexpected look at Lubavtich life in New York City, Guggenheim Fellow Darcy Padilla’s grim glimpse at teenage homelessness, and W. Eugene Smith Grant recipient Mark Peterson’s portrait of a JROTC in her prom dress, among many others.

 Poignant in their ability to reveal the strength of rebellion alongside the inevitable vulnerability of adolescent existence, the photographs stand in both contrast and correspondence to each other. The lives of Muslim teens, Mormon missionaries, AGs (macho lesbians), and wannabe models are shown with an edgy empathy that defines the Redux Pictures’ collective.

 The photographs featured in American Youth were edited with the help of Bill Black (Reader’s Digest), Karen Frank (Conde Nast Portfolio), Jeanne Graves (BestLife), Armin Harris (Fortune), Katherine Harris (The Daily Beast), Jane Hwang (ABCNews.com), Michelle Jackson (freelance art buyer, owner of SnapIndigo), Nadja Masri (GEO), Brenda Milis (Men’s Health), Bruce Perez (Redbook), Dora Somosi (GQ) and Allyson Torrisi (Popular Mechanics). The book featured an introduction by Steve Appleford, whose writing has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Rolling Stone, GQ, and Spin.

 Redux Pictures is an editorial and commercial agency based in New York City representing photographers around the world. The agency photographers have been awarded every top prize in photography, have received numerous grants and fellowships and have been exhibited extensively. Redux Photographers include Marc Asnin, Ben Baker, Nina Berman, David Butow, Peter Frank Edwards, Danny Wilcox Frazier, Eros Hoagland, John Keatley, Andy Kropa, Erika Larsen,Gina LeVay, Joshua Lutz, Preston Mack, Kevin J. Miyazaki, Darcy Padilla, Mark Peterson, Michael Rubenstein, Greg Ruffing, Q. Sakamaki, Erin Siegal, Angie Smith, Ben Stechschulte, Brad Swonetz, Nathaniel Welch, and David Yellen.

 Founded in 1995, Contrasto is a leading Publisher of high quality photography books for the global audience. Contrasto’s mission is to create, publish, and distribute the finest photographic culture around the world with books that are beautifully designed, sumptuously printed, and comprehensive in subject matter.
Contrasto’s main themes include contemporary society and current affairs. We give careful attention to the historical photography heritage, as well as to new authors, new views and retrospectives.
Contrasto’s books and authors won the most prestigious international awards, as the Kraszna-Krausz Book Award, the Photo District News Annual Book Award, the Leica Oskar Barnack Award,  and the World Press Photo Award.

www.contrastobooks.com

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BOMBSHELL Cover

BOMBSHELL Cover

BOMBSHELL: The Life and Crimes of Claw Money

By Claw Money

Texts by Patti Astor, Martha Cooper, Roger Gastman, Sacha Jenkins, 
Maripol, Minya Quirk, DAZE, MISS 17, and WEST

A Miss Rosen Edition

“She came, she CLAWED, she conquered!!!” —YES2

A two-toned, three-taloned CLAW paw has been sprawled in aerosol across walls around the world since the early 1990s. Whether lolling in the East Village or lazing in Los Angeles, lounging in Amsterdam or living it up in Milan, the instantly identifiable icon maintains a fun, fabulous, and feminine allure, despite the grit and grime that makes graffiti a man’s world. One of the first writers to use an icon as her throw up, CLAW is of the rarest breed: the female graff King.

Not content to beat the boys at their own game, CLAW also designs her own clothing line, Claw Money, as well as a jewelry and accessory line, literally creating her own street style. Emblazoned on t-shirts, sweatshirts, purses, and panties, her emblematic icon gets love from everyone, be 
it graff legends or new jacks, riot grrls or fashionistas, or school kids and soccer moms. A magazine fashion editor, brand consultant, vintage clothing collector, and lady about town, Claw Money is New York City’s best kept secret.

Bombshell, her first book, explodes all preconceived notions about the icon many have seen but few have known. From the deepest recesses of her shoeboxes comes this incredible compendium of photographs, designs, personal letters, and other ephemera collected throughout her life. Whether it’s shots of spots she bombed in the Bronx or Grandma Baba’s recipe for latkes, fashion shoots or candid snaps, Bombshell redefines the graffiti monograph, taking you beyond the icon and into the realm of Claw Money.

Claw Money was born in Queens and raised in Long Island. After dropping out of the Fashion Institute of Technology, Claw began bombing with legendary writers and founded graff crew PMS. Claw has worked as a fashion stylist for Korn, Ice-T, Ice Cube, and Guns N’ Roses, and has styled for Nike, adidas, Sector Watches, and Guiness. She launched Claw Money, her signature clothing line, in Spring, 2002. Fashion editor of Swindle magazine, Claw is also co-branding with Ecko Red International, Kid Robot and Hasbro, and BPMW. Featured in the 2005 documentary Infamy, Claw has also been seen inAutograf: New York City’s Graffiti Writers by Peter Sutherland (powerHouse Books, 2004), Supreme Quality and Enamelizedby Roger Gastman (Gingko Press, 2005 and 2004, respectively), as well as countless magazines around the world. She lives and works in New York City.

claw7892303-550px

Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History, 1955-Present, By Gail Buckland

Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History, 1955-Present, By Gail Buckland

 

Maripol’s work as an art director and designer has influenced popular movements in music, fashion, and art since the early 1980s. She was the founder of Maripolitan Popular Objects Ltd., a fashion accessories company that also designed merchandising for Madonna’s “Like a Virgin” tour. Maripol has art directed films by Marcus Nispel and Abel Ferrara; and music videos for Cher, D’Angelo, Elton John, and Luther Vandross. Her clients also include Kodak, L’Oreal, Panasonic, and Peugeot. Maripol’s work has been exhibited at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, Deitch Projects, the Robert Miller Gallery, New York; Musée Maillol, Paris. Maripol has produced films including Downtown 81, which she also art directed, Just an American Boy by Amos Poe, and Face addicts by Edo Bertoglio. She has been published in The New York Times Magazine, WWD, ELLE, i-D, V Magazine, Anthem, Black Book, Nylon, Trace, InStyle, Time Out New York, and The Village Voice, Kurv among countless others. Maripol’s books include Maripolarama (powerHouse Books, 2008) New York Beat: The Making of Downtown 81 (Petit Grand, 2001) and Mes Polas: 1977–90s (Art Random, 1990). Maripol lives between Paris and New York with her teenage son Lino.

 Maripol discusses her work, Madonna, Danceteria, NYC, 1982, selected for publication in Who Shot Rock & Roll by Gail Buckland (Knopf, October 2009, $40).

 Madonna

Tell me about how you came to be carrying around your Polaroid camera at parties? I ask as the Polaroid is (and was) something so special; before digital technology it was the instant photo; and even now it is so much more—it preserves the photograph as an object (and not just an image/scan). What was it about the Polaroid that had you spending crazy $$ on film in order to get these photos, and how did people react when you asked to shoot them?

Maripol: I carried my camera everywhere indeed and I still have it; its the brown leather clad SX70s. I took it to Studio 54, to Mudd Club, at Fiorucci , on weekends to Montauk, in bed (ha-ha). It’s true it was kind of expensive (like a dollar, a shot) but there was no waste; I used paint, scratch, or cut up the bad results. I knew all of my subjects and the intimacy of the Polaroid did not threaten them. One time I asked David Bowie If I could snap and he said, “No, no darling,” so I respected it!

Downtown NYC in the early 80s is my dream era; post-punk style meeting old-school glamour—and you (in my opinion) were the catalyst for so much of the look. You are a designer, stylist, photographer, artist, model, the IT GIRL of the time. How were you able to fuse your vision with the personalities of the period?

Thanks, I am honored. I think I worked with my instincts getting to dig up materials for objects, and worked when a live model with an idea could have the most impact. It was sort of a sixth sense!

How did you connect to Madonna? What was it about her personality that connected with your own, and what was the inspiration for her revolutionary look—the rubber bracelets, lace hair ties, lingerie and leggings, etc.?

Madonna came to me with Martin B. to help with her style for her first album. In a few words, I would say she was fresh, smart, sexy, active, and just perfect. I thought, “What about a girl named Madonna wearing my crosses on her ears, blasphemous enough and punk.” The rest was like having a Marilyn Monroe in my hands; the 80s were like the 50s; it was all about symbols. She signed the album cover, “For the most perverted mother that I ever had.”

I remember when Madonna came out big on her second album, and all of a sudden everyone was rocking her look. I remember the “Like a Virgin” video when she was dancing on the gondola and the “Borderline” video where she kicked the lamppost with her lime green pumps—hah! I wasn’t even in love with the music, but the outfits—divine! How did it feel to see a legion of women—from little girls to grandmas, suddenly rocking variations on your designs?

There was a Madonna look-alike contest at Macy’s and 100 girls came. Andy Warhol and I were judges and we had a lot of fun. It was surreal but kind of sad at the same time that they could not have their own personalities. That was the power of MTV! But think of it: it happened before with the Beatles, Michael Jackson, Sonny and Cher… It even happened to me. My biggest influence when I was young was David Bowie, his Ziggy Stardust looks, his music, so I went to London when I was 16th and bought green platform boots above the knees which I wore with hot pants, when I returned to my Catholic boarding school they asked me to change—just like Madonna!

 

WICKED Front Cover

WICKED Front Cover

From stage to page, it’s Wicked as you’ve never experienced it before!

The very first theater pop-up book ever published, Wicked The Musical: A Pop-Up Compendium of Splendiferous Delight and Thrillifying Intrigue (Melcher Media, October 2009, $29.95) recreates some of the most unforgettable moments from the smash-hit, record-breaking, Tony Award-winning musical that has captivated audiences around the globe, including:

  • Glinda’s dramatic descent among the Ozians in her bubble machine
  • Elphaba defying gravity
  • The Monkeys’ amazing release from captivity

Plus, discover secret artifacts (and artifictions) that you won’t find anywhere else:

  • The actual letters Galinda and Elphaba wrote home to their parents.
  • A tourist-friendly map of the Emerald City and fact sheet with must-have information about the city.
  • The Shiz University Gazette, a student newspaper featuring an exclusive interview with Fiyero Tigelar, an Op-ed piece by Dr. Dillamond in defense of animal rights, and advice for the lovelorn by Galinda Upland, among other stories.
  • A munchkin-sized Grimmerie complete with spells to practice at home.

With a storybook-style telling of Wicked that allows you to experience the musical again and again (and again!), this richly detailed, beautifully illustrated, handcrafted gift book is designed for children of all ages. Produced by Melcher Media, Wicked The Musical: A Pop-Up Compendium of Splendiferous Delight and Thrillifying Intrigue is the perfect companion volume to Wicked: The Grimmerie (Melcher Media/Hyperion, 2006), the most successful theater book in history with over a quarter of a million copies in print—and counting.

Wicked The Musical: A Pop-Up Compendium of Splendifirous Delight

Wicked The Musical: A Pop-Up Compendium of Splendiferous Delight and Thrillifying Intrigue

To quote the Wizard himself: It’s wonderful!

Creative Team

Greg Call (Illustrator) has worked for clients including Disney, TOR, Time Warner, HarperCollins, Penguin Putnam, Random House, Simon & Schuster, Universal Studios, Paramount Pictures, The National Football League, Capitol Records, Curb Records, Priority Records, A&M Records, Sega, and Hasbro. Greg has been recognized for his work repeatedly and has gained awards from the Society of Illustrators and Addy among others. He lives in Montana.

Kees Moebeerk (Paper Engineer) has created numerous pop-up books for children and grown-ups, including a dimensional adaptation of Stephen King’s The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon and The Master of Suspense, a pop-up translation of seven Alfred Hitchcock movies. For Melcher Media he has made The Pop-up Book of Sex, The Neiman Marcus Pop-up Book, and Even More Outrageous Celebrity Meltdowns. He lives in the Netherlands.

Paul Kepple (Graphic Designer) is better known as Headcase Design, an award-winning graphic design and illustration studio based in Philadelphia. His work has been recognized by such publications as the AIGA’s 365 and 50 Books/50 Covers, American Illustration, Communication Arts, and Print. For Melcher Media, Kepple has designed Wicked: The Grimmerie, Jessica Seinfeld’s Deceptively Delicious, Jersey Boys, and many more.

Melcher Media (Producer) is an award-winning content producer and book packager that has conceived and produced projects for a diverse group of clients from HBO to the Smithsonian Institution. With over 120 titles to its credit, totaling more than 12 million books in print, Melcher Media’s expertise at brand extension and skill at translating nontraditional media into print has propelled many of the company’s books onto national bestseller lists and garnered them numerous industry awards. A sample of Melcher Media’s award-winning books includes: Top Chef, Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth, The Lucky Shopping Manual, South Park: A Stickyforms Adventure, Rent (the Broadway musical), Wicked: The Grimmerie, The Pop-Up Book of Phobias, The Pop-up Book of Celebrity Meltdowns, Sex and the City: Kiss and Tell, and Jessica Seinfeld’s Deceptively Delicious.

Wicked The Musical: A Pop-Up Compendium of Splendiferous Delight and Thrillifying Intrigue

Wicked The Musical: A Pop-Up Compendium of Splendiferous Delight and Thrillifying Intrigue

About the Broadway musical Wicked

Winner of 26 major awards including the Grammy Award and three Tony Awards, Wicked is the untold story of the witches of Oz.  Long before Dorothy drops in, two other girls meet in the land of Oz.  One, born with emerald-green skin, is smart, fiery and misunderstood.  The other is beautiful, ambitious and very popular.  Wicked tells the story of their remarkable odyssey, how these two unlikely friends grow to become the Wicked Witch of the West and Glinda the Good.

Declared “A Cultural Phenomenon” by Variety, Wicked currently has productions in New York, San Francisco, London, Tokyo, Stuttgart, Melbourne and on two North American tours.  Based on the novel by Gregory Maguire, Wicked has music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, and a book by Winnie Holzman.  The production is directed by Joe Mantello with musical staging by Wayne Cilento.  Wicked is produced by Marc Platt, Universal Pictures, The Araca Group, Jon B. Platt and David Stone.

PUBLIC ACCESS Cover

PUBLIC ACCESS Cover

Public Access

Ricky Powell Photographs 1985–2005

Texts by Ricky Powell, Charlie Ahearn, Glenn O’Brien, Zoe Cassavetes,

ZEPHYR, QUIK, DR.REVOLT, and TEAM

A Miss Rosen Edition

Eric B. and Rakim, the Apollo Theater, NYC, 1988

Eric B. and Rakim, the Apollo Theater, NYC, 1988

“Ricky Powell, aka the Rickster, has seen a lot of history. He has worked variously as a busboy, bike messenger…Frozade vender, substitute teacher, columnist, cable television host, comic, and dog walker. But he is best known as a wisecracking, self-described ‘playground rat’ who used his beat-up Minolta and party-crashing skills to become a nightlife fixture and a chronicler of the then-exploding world of hip hop.”

—The New York Times


“The Rickster was kinda like the Weegee of hip hop. Everywhere you went he would be there with a camera around his neck.”         —Fab 5 Freddy

For two decades, Ricky Powell has prowled the streets of his native New York, toured the world with hip hop’s biggest acts, and full-on crashed celebrity-studded parties on both coasts. Equipped with only his wits and an instamatic camera, Powell elbowed his way into the center of the scene with no shame. “It’s for public access,” Powell could be heard, pleading for an interview with a pizza shop owner on his cult cable TV show, Rappin’ with the Rickster.”

Powell knows access is everything, and he delivers. In Public Access: Ricky Powell Photographs 1985–2005, Powell presents the actors, musicians, performers, and artists that inspired him, including Run DMC, Public Enemy, Rakim, Slick Rick, Eazy E, Method Man, LL Cool J, Fab 5 Freddy, Steven Tyler, Nina Hagen, John Bloodclot, John Lee Hooker, LeRoy Neiman, Martha Graham, Elizabeth Taylor, Calvin Klein, Barbara Walters, Grace Jones, Francis Ford Coppola, Sofia Coppola, Cindy Crawford, Dondi, Doze Green, Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Andy Warhol, as well as everyday people Powell spotted on the street. Also presented in Public Access are Powell’s never-before-published collaborations with top artists, graffiti writers, and photographers including Ron Galella, Ron English, Phil Frost, Lee Quinones, Sam Flores, David Choe, Dalek, DR.REVOLT, ZEPHYR, QUIK, TEAM, DAZE, SEEN, KAWS, JEST,BIGFOOT, SSUR, and HAZE, among others.

Jason Mizell, aka Jam Master Jay, on the Raising Hell tour, New Orleans, 1986 (RIP) While I was taking this shot, I remember thinking to myself, "Damn, I hit the 'Big Time.'"

Jason Mizell, aka Jam Master Jay, on the Raising Hell tour, New Orleans, 1986 (RIP) While I was taking this shot, I remember thinking to myself, "Damn, I hit the 'Big Time.'"

Ricky Powell, a native New Yorker, graduated from Hunter College with a B.S. in physical education. His work has been published in The New York Times, the New York Post, the Daily News, The Village Voice, Time, Newsweek, VIBE, The Source, Rolling Stone, Spin, Details, Paper, Mass Appeal, Word Up!, Ego Trip, and Grand Royal, to name a few. Powell’s clients have included Cannon, MTV, NBC, the Apollo Theater, Capitol Records, and Weiden + Kennedy, among others. His work has been exhibited at the Eyejammie Fine Arts Gallery, New York and Upper Playground, San Francisco and was featured in “500 of the Greatest Rock and Roll Photos,” presented by Kodak. Powell is the author of Frozade Moments (Eyejammie.com, 2005), Oh Snap!: The Rap Photography of Ricky Powell (St. Martin’s, 1998) and The Rickford Files: Classic New York Photographs (St. Martin’s, 1999). He lives and works in New York.

WHO SHOT ROCK & ROLL Cover

WHO SHOT ROCK & ROLL Cover

From Elton John to Led Zeppelin, Bjork to Janis Joplin, James Brown to John Lennon, Who Shot Rock & Roll is the first book to explore the extraordinary work of the photographers who captured the energy, intoxication, rebellion, and magic of rock & roll with images that have become icons unto themselves.

Featuring more than 250 photos, including many rare and never-before-seen images, Who Shot Rock & Roll is an unparalleled compendium of our shared cultural history. Author and photo historian Gail Buckland provides a compelling collection of portraits, live concert shots, behind-the-scenes snaps, and studio work selected for their aesthetic quality and power. The extended captions tell stories from the photographers that reveal their roll as both creative collaborators and tireless journalists.

As Buckland writes, “Rock and roll is not a musical genre; it is a communal spirit.”  Her book reveals the very essence of rock photography- these mythical rock gods could not exist without artists to document their gifts. “Who Shot Rock & Roll is a silent window into a world of sound,” Buckland continues. “There are photographs of crowds and fans reminiscent of the great historical paintings of battle scenes where bodies blend and bend and faces radiate with what can only be described as transcendence. Snapshots reveal the passion, ambition, and insecurity of aspiring young musicians. There are portraits of godheads, objects of mass adoration; the best could hang next to paintings of Renaissance princes, so similar are these royals with their finery, wealth, and power.”

From Ryan McGinley’s Morrissey crowds to Bob Gruen’s John Lennon, Maripol’s Madonna to Richard Avedon’s Everly Brothers, David LaChapelle’s Lil Kim to Henry Diltz’s Tina Turner, Who Shot Rock & Roll presents our idols at their most divine, as captured by some of the greatest artists—most of whom are yet to be recognized—to work in photography.

Featured subjects include:

The B-52s, The Beatles, Chuck Berry, Bjork, Blondie, David Bowie, Bow Wow Wow, James Brown, Johnny Cash, Nick Cave, Exene Cervenka, Eric Clapton, The Clash, Kurt Cobain, Elvis Costello, The Cramps, The Dead Boys, P. Diddy, The Doors, Bob Dylan, Marianne Faithful, Aretha Franklin, Alan Freed, Fugazi, Jerry Garcia, Bill Haley, Debbie Harry, Richard Hell, Jimi Hendrix, Buddy Holly, Michael Jackson, Mick Jagger, Jay-Z, Brian Jones, Grace Jones, Janis Joplin, Joy Division, KISS, Gladys Knight, Led Zep, John Lennon, Little Richard, LL Cool J, Madonna, The Mamas and the Papas, Marilyn Manson, Bob Marley, Paul McCartney, Freddy Mercury, Metallica, Method Man, Morrissey, Jim Morrison, New York Dolls, Notorious B.I.G., Oasis, Wilson Pickett, Pink Floyd, The Police, Iggy Pop, Elvis Presley, The Pretenders, Prince, The Prodigy, Radiohead, The Ramones, Red Hot Chili Peppers, R.E.M., Keith Richards, The Ronettes, Rolling Stones, Henry Rollins, Axl Rose, Run-DMC, Salt n Pepa, Sex Pistols, Tupac Shakur,  Sid & Nancy, Patti Smith, Sonic Youth, The Specials, Buffalo Springfield, Bruce Springsteen, Sly Stone, Joe Strummer, Talking Heads, Pete Townsend, Ike & Tina Turner, U2, Velvet Underground, Bunny Wailer, The White Stripes, The Who, Amy Winehouse, Stevie Wonder, Neil Young, and Frank Zappa.

Featured photographers include:

Amy Arbus, Richard Avedon, Ray Avery, David Bailey, Roberta Bayley, Peter Beste, Adrian Boot, Justin Borucki, Patti Boyd, Ed Caraeff, Stephanie Chernikowski, Danny Clinch, Anton Corbijn, David Corio, Kevin Cummins, Henry Diltz, Alain Dister, George DuBose, Andy Earl, Barry Feinstein, Danny Fields, Nat Finkelstein, Glen E. Friedman, Jill Furmanovsky, David Gahr, Godlis, Lynn Goldsmith, Harry Goodwin, Julia Gorton, Jean-Paul Goude, Bob Gruen, Andreas Gursky, Ross Halfin, Hipgnosis, Dennis Hopper, Don Hunstein, Marvin Israel, Art Kane, Richard Kern, Daniel Kramer, David LaChapelle, Elliott Landy, Michael Lavine, Lisa Law, Annie Leibowitz, Jean-Pierre Leloir, , Laura Levine, Ari Marcopoulos, Maripol, Jim Marshall, Elaine Mayes, Linda McCartney, Ryan McGinley, Dennis Morris, Shawn Mortensen, Terry O’Neill, Jean-Marie Perier, Charles Peterson, Ricky Powell, Michael Putland, William “Popsie” Randolph, Marcia Resnick, Ebet Roberts, Mick Rock, Ethan Russell, Jerry Schatzberg, Hannes Schmid, Stephane Sednaoui, Bob Seidemann, Mark Seliger, Stephen Shames, Lloyd Shearer, Kate Simon, Hedi Slimane, Pennie Smith, Gloria Stavers, Chris Stein, Ray Stevenson, Mayayoshi Sukita, Allan Tannenbaum, Edmund Teske, Storm Thorgerson, Ian Tilton, Philip Townsend, Albert Watson, Guy Webster, Barrie Wentzell, Alfred Wertheimer, Kevin Westenberg, Robert Whitaker, Timothy White, Ernest C. Withers, and Baron Wolman.

An exhibition of work from the book will launch at the Brooklyn Museum on October 30 and tour the United States through 2011. The schedule follows:

Brooklyn Museum

October 30th 2009 – January 31st 2010

http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/

Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts

March 5th – May 30th 2010

http://www.worcesterart.org/

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Tennessee

June 26th – September 26th 2010

http://www.brooksmuseum.org/

Akron Art Museum, Ohio

October 23rd 2010 – January 23rd 2011

http://www.akronartmuseum.org/

Columbia Museum of Art, South Carolina

February 24th – May 22nd 2011

http://www.columbiamuseum.org/

Gail Buckland has written and collaborated on eleven books of photographic history, including Fox Talbot and the Invention of Photography, The Magic Image (with Cecil Beaton), and The American Century (by Harold Evans). She is former curator of the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain, professor of the history of photography at The Cooper Union, and guest curator at many American museums. She lives in Warwick, New York, and New York City.

GLITTERATI INCORPORATED

August 11, 2009

COCO CHANEL by Douglas Kirkland

COCO CHANEL by Douglas Kirkland

Founded in 2002 by Marta Hallett, Glitterati Incorporated is a New York-based independent publisher specializing in high-end illustrated titles dedicated to elevating the discourse in art and culture. With titles spotlighting work from Coco Chanel, Natori, Villa d’Este, Ralph Pucci, and the kitchen of Mrs. Charles Darwin. With over 30 years experience, Hallett has built Glitterati’s reputation as publisher of modern beauty and iconography with fashion and beauty, architecture and design, photography and film, food and lifestyle, travel, and children’s books.

Since 1973, Hallett has been in the book publishing industry, first as the partner in independent producer Running Heads and later residing at the helm of houses including HarperCollins illustrated books divisions (excluding children’s and reference), Smithmark Publishers, Stewart, Tabori, & Chang’s S Editions, and Rizzoli International Publications, where she worked with luminaries including Charles Berlitz, Charles Schultz, Fleur Cowles, and Frank Gehry. With nearly four decades of experience in art book publishing, producing innovative and superior-quality illustrated projects to a variety of customers, Hallett has created partnerships with organizations and corporations including Saks Fifth Avenue, Macy’s, The Studio Museum of Harlem, and the International Center of Photography, all in NY; The Mariinsky Theatre, St. Petersburg, Russia; Vh-1, Essence Magazine, and Seventeen Magazine, among many others.

Glitterati offers a new approach to illustrated publishing unfettered by the restrictions of working for a large corporation. “Glitterati has given me the opportunity to really run the whole shebang,” Hallett observes, “and to personally integrate my interests and my skill in creating something that attaches itself to the niche categories, which is harder and harder for the big publishers to do. As they move towards serving a more mass audience because of their profit requirements, I sensed there was an opportunity for a small publisher to serve the smaller markets profitably while providing high quality books to an eager audience.

SHOW by Ralph Pucci

SHOW by Ralph Pucci

“I chose the name Glitterati because all of my authors have “day jobs;” that is, they have a platform, although it’s not usually a publishing platform. To me this is the brave new world of what the future of all publishing will be: an opportunity for innovation and flexibility to respond to the marketplace; a real chance to see what is happening in the world and attach the business to it; and making a decision about where the world will go and then producing the product to make it go in that direction.”

Marta Hallett © Jianai Jenny Chen

Marta Hallett © Jianai Jenny Chen

Founder and Publisher of Glitterati, Marta Hallett has been in the book publishing industry since 1973, and has since been at the helm of houses including HarperCollins, Smithmark, and Rizzoli. With nearly four decades of experience in art book publishing, Hallett discusses her insights into the industry, revealing her ability to stand at the center of the storm and commitment to discovering the silver lining in tough economic times.

Glitterati: Having been in the book publishing industry since 1973, you must have seen some impressive changes to the industry. What stands out in your mind as the most dramatic changes to the industry?

Marta Hallett: When I started in publishing, there was a small market for art and architecture, but there was almost no pop culture publishing. Illustrated books were “imported” books and so everything associated with illustrated books was a mystery.

I was lucky enough to be a managing editor on The Cook’s Catalogue, which gave me my start, was one of the first illustrated popular books, at the behest of Peter Mayer, who then headed Avon and was seen as a boy genius!  Production managers didn’t know about four-color printing, never mind editors who understood the process to make an illustrated book “package.” The concept of a collaboration between creatives—rather than a linear progression to produce a book that was controlled by an editor and an author from manuscript to finished book—was totally the norm.

All that has changed. Today virtually every American publisher produces illustrated books, which have themselves moved from the category of being merely informative, to being an object in and of itself.

HarperCollins, Smithmark, Rizzoli—you’ve been at the helm of some of the most esteemed publishing houses in the country. What were the strength and weaknesses of leading such large-scale companies?

The positive aspect is that corporations to some extent have brands that can woo authors into paying attention to ideas that editors offer; and they have funds to take risks that small publishers don’t.

The weakness is clearly corporate culture: the need to have literally hundreds of opinions at time to make a decision. Ironically, I think this is the reason for the downfall of publishing; a successful house (failures included) is one that has a single entrepreneurial vision that is executed by a tight team led by someone with the leading vision. But the corporate environment doesn’t allow for this kind of single-mindedness or fast movement forward or flexibility…so with the endless meetings to gather opinions and commentary and signatures (!) on paperwork, the entire process is reduced to that—a process—rather than a creative collaboration between departments. I don’t think it’s avoidable, sadly.

Why did you decide to leave the corporate world and go into business for yourself?

It really wasn’t my decision at all to move to the private sector, in that my division was closed down as it became harder and harder to be profitable. I felt that even if I did move to another corporate organization, I would be encountering all of the issues that kept me from doing what I really like to do as a creative person.

I felt that after 30 years I had the skills, the contacts, and the initiative to develop a new way of looking at illustrated publishing that the corporate cultures wouldn’t allow so that I might as well put my money where my mouth was. Instead of bemoaning the problems of being successful in a large corporation, I should get out there and prove that my theory of how to publish successfully both financially and intellectually was possible!

What was the inspiration for the Glitterati brand? What does it symbolize to you? STOLEN MOMENTS The Photographs of Ronny Jacques

Over the years I have worked at numerous jobs, reinventing myself as packager, publisher, book club director, which has allowied me to look at the work, the industry, my job, from a new perspective.

I felt that Glitterati could give me the opportunity to really run the whole shebang (which is no longer possible in the corporate environment) and to personally integrate my interests and my skill in creating something that attaches itself to the niche categories, which is harder and harder for the big publishers to do. As they move towards serving a more mass audience because of their profit requirements, I sensed there was an opportunity for a small publisher to serve the smaller markets.  Glitterati doesn’t have the same overheads, profit needs of a large publisher so I can do smaller print runs profitably and still provide high quality books to an eager audience.

I chose the name Glitterati because all of my authors have day jobs; that is they have a platform, although it’s not usually a publishing platform. To me this is the brave new world of what the future of all publishing will be: an opportunity for innovation and flexibility to respond to the marketplace; a real chance to see what is happening in the world and attach the business to it (rather than the reverse, which is the constraint of so many big companies); and making a decision about where the world willL go and then producing the product to make it go in that direction.

What has been the most challenging aspect of running an independent publishing house? What has been the most rewarding? The most surprising?

The most challenging aspect is clearly cash flow! I always say without this element of surprise my job would be perfect. Sadly, as a small company, even with fairly profitable receipts, the timing of those receipts is always an issue and never adequate to keep up with the expenses. So it’s dreary to be dealing with issues that as a publisher you know will be solved in a matter of time; but are emergencies at the moment and affecting suppliers’ stress levels!

The most rewarding aspect has honestly been seeing books that we’ve published that I knew would not have been taken on by another publisher, succeed not just in terms of sales numbers but receive recognition as the finest books published. I remember walking into a bookstore on Lexington Avenue after we had published only about five books, introducing myself and the owner saying, “Oh we love Glitterati books!’  I thought, “This must be a joke, we haven’t published enough books to BE a recognizable brand.” But in some corners we were and are and that is very gratifying.

The other aspect is the actual ability to create and control the destiny of the books, to be able to work with other creative people to make something more wonderful than any of us would have made on our own. I love working with creative people whose goal is just to make the best work possible, and figuring out how to tailor that to the commercial needs of the consumer world.

The most surprising thing is that there is always a new problem that is unanticipated. I always joke that every book has 26 Stations of the Cross and I know that at about Station 18, every author is going to have separation anxiety. But there are other surprises and I think that is what keeps this work so inspiring. These potentials keep us interested in the process, which otherwise might become humdrum and overwhelming; it’s incredibly labor intensive producing illustrated books and the momentum is only kept up because of the constant surprises—both good and bad.

What do you look for when signing up a project? How important is the balance between creativity and marketability in your business model?

I look for books that are of interest to me. I look at whether Glitterati can better publish the book than someone else. I look at how commercially and financially viable the book is: what is the platform of the author, how strong is that category in general in terms of book sales, is it one in which Glitterati has already made its presence known? I think I probably consider all of the same things that all publishers consider, I just give different weights to issues that make it a good fit for Glitterati, ­or not.

I would say that for Glitterati creativity is marketability. As a small publisher trying to make an impact and a name for itself, we distinguish ourselves from all the big boys by through the personality to the book and the way we publish it. We try not to get swept away by something beautiful and brilliant that we know the buyers in any store (small or large) won’t want to stock. We’ve only had a few cases where we’ve done books so over the top that they probably won’t be acknowledged for 15 years as the incredible pieces of work that they are. In general, the niche market, because it goes outside bookstores, is pretty accommodating to creative new ideas.

There has been tremendous growth of independent art book publishers over the past decade. Why do

Mrs. Charles Darwin's Recipe Book by Dusha Bateman

Mrs. Charles Darwin's Recipe Book by Dusha Bateman

you think this segment of the industry has expanded? How does Glitterati stand in relation to its competitors and colleagues?

I think that this segment has expanded because major houses dealing with art books have scaled back in the past decade because of issues of profitability so there are more editors without a corporate home available to them; and because the nature of the beast is best served through having an independent publishing mission with a Renaissance nature where the leadership knows art, trends, business, design, and editorial.

I think that Glitterati has actually created something of a reputation that is in line with what we publish. We produce books that can go to a variety of audiences and sometimes particularly ignore the mainstream in order to utilize the platform of our glittery authors to extend book sales outside the normal channels. We have the capacity to move our books into other markets either by working through author contacts, or the contacts that have generated through non-book markets recognizing our product as distinctive and endorsing it through buys and word of mouth.

In many ways, the old model of book publishing no longer fits the world as we know it. The monolithic corporations are cracking and crumbling, while the independents are struggling to survive. What do you see as the benefits to running your own business in a time of economic instability?

Ironically, the economic turndown has had very little effect on us for a few reasons. We sell at least 50% of our books on an annual basis outside the bookstore markets so we are impervious to those ups and downs. We sell to the high-end niche of clientele, and these people are less sensitive to the ups and downs of the economy. We sell, even when highly successful, in a relatively small quantity (usually about 5,000 copies per title) and this is a number that is not viable financially for most mainstream publishers to be profitable and affordable for us because we have such low overheads. In addition, because we are small and independently run, we can turn on a dime and change our product line quickly or amend our publishing plan to suit the market in a much more flexible way. We don’t work three years’ out; we work on a 9-month basis which allows us to go with the flow of the economy, trends, and content.

Marta and her dog Belle

Marta and her dog Belle. © Jianai Jenny Chen

COWBOY AND WILLS COVER

“A boy and his dog—that is sacred stuff. Layer on to that autism and the singular love of a mother and you’ve got the makings for deeply worthwhile reading. Monica Holloway is any one of us, doubled-over with hope and pain and wishing.”

—Kelly Corrigan

New York Times bestselling author of The Middle Place

The day after Monica Holloway’s adorable three year-old son Wills is diagnosed with Austism Spectrum Disorder, she takes him to a pet store. From her first impulse purchase of a full aquarium, Holloway quickly graduates to hermit crabs, hamsters, African dwarf frogs, and a rabbit. But like all children, what Wills wants most was a puppy. That Christmas, eight-week old Cowboy arrives and forever changes their lives.

A blond, brown-eyed golden retriever, Cowboy is more than a house pet; she is the bridge between Wills and the rest of the world. Cowboy’s very presence in his life empowered Wills to take risks, to engage and socialize, to establish meaningful and intimate connections with the world around him. Detailing their devotion to each other, Cowboy & Wills (Simon Spotlight Entertainment, October 2009, $24) is a love story like no other.

Like peanut butter and jelly, Cowboy and Wills are the perfect pair. Where Wills is cautious, fastidious, and tender hearted, Cowboy is rambunctious, affectionate, and impulsive. Soon, the boy who could barely say hello to his kindergarten classmates is going on playdates, learning to swim, and sleeping in his own bed. Through it all, Cowboy is there, dragging him toward other children and giving him the confidence to face his fears—with her by his side.

But love is not enough to save the beautiful Cowboy from her fate, and the cruel world of puppy mills quickly catches up to them. When Cowboy is diagnosed with lupus, Wills and his family realize that they must be there for her, just as she was there for them.

Cowboy & Wills reveals the mysterious manifestation and inexplicable power of love, loss, and salvation.  Weaving a mesmerizing tale of hope and despair, anxiety and assurance, trust and doubt, Holloway’s matchless talent for crafting stories infinite joy and pain makes her one of the foremost memoirists of our age.

Praise for Cowboy & Wills

“A young boy with autism is able to make friends with the aid of his pet dog named Cowboy.  Pets can help open up social doors.”

—Temple Grandin

New York Times bestselling author of Animals in Translation and Animals Make us Human

“Monica Holloway has me laughing AND crying within the first five pages of Cowboy & Wills. She crafts artful, and so often, hysterical observations of everyday life, while also revealing the many dimensions of heartache that come with being a mother who wants only the best for her family. Monica is the genuine article when it comes to pitch perfect memoir writing.”

—Jennifer Lauck

New York Times bestselling author of Blackbird and Still Waters

“Monica Holloway’s, Cowboy & Wills is a refreshing look at high functioning autism.  Her writing is personal, insightful, informative, and helpful. I highly recommend this book to families with autism, as well as to others who wish to gain a better understanding of the challenges and victories these families face.”

—Elaine Hall

CoachE! in Autism: The Musical and author of Now I See the Moon

Author bio:

MONICA HOLLOWAYMonica Holloway is the author of Driving With Dead People, described by Newsweek called “unforgettable,” Glamour christened “a classic,” and the Washington Post deemed “irresistible.” A contributor to the anthologies Mommy Wars and the Bigger the Better the Tighter the Sweater, Holloway lives in Los Angeles. http://www.monicaholloway.com/

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